Trauma Training

What I am about to tell you might surprise you. Despite completing a biblical counseling certificate program and a masters degree in counseling, I never received specific training in trauma. Yet, as a biblical and licensed counselor I encounter trauma regularly in caring for people. The lack of trauma training is not a result of a sub-par education or inferior equipping. On the contrary, I received excellent training both biblically and clinically. Instead, it has more to do with the fact that best practices for trauma care are relatively new to the world of counseling and even more novel to the world of biblical counseling. At the same time, it is also true that people today are more significantly impacted by trauma than ever before.

It was once assumed that a person had to have gone through a tragic situation or personally witnessed something horrible to experience trauma. But now, with access to atrocities through the internet, we are exposed to trauma at increasing rates. And it’s is not just exposure but re-exposure as we watch and rewatch tragedies unfold on the screens we carrying around in our pockets. In addition we are far more aware of the compounding impact of “little t” trauma as well as vicarious trauma that we encounter in our efforts to help others. There has never been a time where training in trauma is more needed than there is today. There has never been a time where biblical training in trauma has ever been more crucial and relevant than right now. Despite this, there are few who have the expertise to offer trauma training from a biblical perspective. This led me to pursue specific equipping in trauma and I am thrilled to be one of the instructors for an upcoming trauma training for Christian counselors and biblical lay counselors.

Fundamentals of Trauma Healing is an eight-hour training designed for the Christian professional and lay counselors who desire to learn the basics for counseling clients who have experienced past trauma. The instructors will teach the course content using biblical principles from a distinctly Christian worldview. 

The course is offered in an online live venue through Zoom. All participants will receive a packet of materials prior to the course which will include session outlines and resources. Participants will interact with the instructors through Q&A and chat messages during the scope of the course and may be given the opportunity to process with others through smaller breakout groups.

This course is an overview of counseling practices for providing counsel and care after a traumatic event or series of events. It does not cover advanced methods, but will lay a foundation to help you care well for the traumatized. Due to the interactive nature and sensitive topic of this training, it is best experienced live. Recorded sessions will not be offered.

Elements included in the training inclue:

  • A Biblical view of trauma healing
  • Attachment and trauma
  • The effects of trauma on the brain and body
  • Grounding techniques
  • Guided prayer in trauma healing
  • Assessment measures
  • Treatment tools and techniques
  • Current research on trauma healing

Date:

July 23, 6:00-9:00 pm, Central Standard Time and July 24, 8:30 am – 4:00 pm, Central Standard Time

Cost:

  • Professional Counselors$150.00+$10.76 Professional Fee (CE’s available for TX licensed counselors.)
  • Students/Lay Counselors$100.00+$7.72 Professional Fee

Schedule:

Friday, July 23:

6:00-7:15pm Session 1: Trauma & the Biblical Worldview

7:15-7:30pm Break

7:30-8:45pm Session 2: The Brain/Body/Soul Connection

Saturday, July 24:

8:30-9:15am Session 3: Childhood Attachment and Trauma

9:15-9:30am Break

9:30-10:45am Session 4:  Stage 1 Healing (Safety and Stabilization)

10:45-11:00am Break

11:00am -12:15pm Session 5: Stage 2 Healing (Processing Trauma)

12:15-1:30pm Lunch

1:30-2:15pm Session 6: Stage 3 Healing (Integration of Healing)

2:15-2:30pm Break

2:30-3:30pm Session 7: The Trauma-Informed Church, Family and Society

3:30-4:00pm Session 8: Q&A 

What is biblical self-care?

What makes self-care biblical?

To understand self-care biblically we need to look at it rightly. The best way to approach self-care is through the lens of stewardship. The Bible teaches us to steward all the gifts that God gives us (Luke 12:48; 2 Corinthians 9:6–15; 1 Peter 4:10). When God blesses us with resources, it is our responsibility to steward them wisely. Self-care is simply stewardship of our body, our time, our decisions, our responsibilities, and our relationships.

In The Whole Life: 52 Weeks of Biblical Self-Care, biblical self-care is defined as follows: “The practice of drawing on divinely given resources to steward our whole lives for personal enrichment, the good of others, and the glory of God.” Read that again.

This definition always has God’s glory as the target. In addition, others are blessed but not at the expense of totally depleting yourself. Too often, Christians pay little attention to their own needs or care. They believe this is a selfless way of living, but it often ends up driving them to a useless state of burnout.

Biblical self-care means we steward the body God gave us and respect our limitations. We steward our life by engaging in things that bring spiritual, emotional, and physical health.

Biblical self-care means we steward our time and seek to wisely say “yes” or “no” based on what is best for ourselves, our families, and others God has placed our lives.

Biblical self-care means we steward the gifts and abilities God has given us to bless others without exhausting ourselves in the process.

Engaging in self-care does not contradict self-sacrifice, nor does it necessarily lead to a self-centered life.

So what might biblical self-care look like in your life?

It is engaging with God in the ordinary sacred places. Perhaps it is you in your favorite chair with just a Bible and a cup of coffee or tea. Or it might meeting with God as you take a walk around the neighborhood or in a park. It can be as quiet as moments in prayer in the middle of the night, or as noisy as a foyer full of chatter as you enter the familiar four walls of your church.

A person who engages in biblical self-care recognizes the best place to go for refreshment is to the One who restores the soul. It is trusting God enough to allow things to wait while you take a nap, eat a meal, exercise, play a game, read a book, or watch show. It is enjoying God through the smile of a dear friend, in the giggles of a little child, or in the unhurried conversation with your neighbor. It is noticing when you are stressed and changing course. It is scheduling check-ups, taking vitamins, asking for help, or taking a vacation. It is doing all these things for your enrichment, for the good of others, and for the glory of God.

The picture in this post is a place I go to often. It is a spot along a walk where I commonly stop to take in the beauty and breathe in the grace of God. For me, this is self-care.

How will you engage in the much-needed practice of biblical self-care?